Presentations

One part of this course is student presentations. Initially, presentations will be done by Computer Science Graduate Students based on papers from conferences and software systems documents; later there may be presentations by other students about programming projects.

There will be three roles associated with papers, large existing software projects, and writing reports associated with presentations:

paper presentation

when the role of the student is paper presentation, then the student should obtain the assigned paper, read it quite carefully, taking notes, formulating questions, observations, and then prepare around ten (10) slides to present the work of the paper to the rest of the class. Before the day of the class, the student should show the slides to the professor for approval and suggestions. See the page Advice on Reading and Presenting which has resources with guidelines on making a presentation. Students should look beyond what is in the paper: there may be existing presentations (videos) from a conference, even slides to be found by the authors of the paper. Copying or redrawing figures from the paper can also be helpful. In a few cases, even looking at primary references can be helpful to present a paper's ideas in context.

software presentation
sometimes we have software that either complements what is in a paper, or it is software for which we have no paper. In such instances, a presentation can be made which explains the software's architecture, perhaps shows its performance (if studies are available), even present illustrative examples from programs and tutorials. Again, a presentation of this sort should be confined to around ten pages. In preparing for a software presentation, it's often useful to look for reviews, articles, and previous presentations about the software.
scribe

the role of the scribe is to write a report, typically one or two pages, which summarizes the main concepts, lessons learned, and questions that come up in the course of reading and presenting. The scribe should also read the paper (or look at the software documentation) and work with the presenter(s) before preparing the report. The report should be in PDF format, which will later be uploaded to this page as a link. Do not put your name on the report (to respect privacy).

Schedule

Below, some days are listed as presentation days. To respect privacy, the names of students are omitted (the students will be assigned in class or by email).

21 April
Presentation on Triangle Counting in Large Graphs.
16 April

Presentation on HyperLogLog.

9 April

Presentation on (Key,Value) NoSQL databases.

7 April

Presentation on Apache ZooKeeper.

12 March
One presentation about MROrchestrator, following the paper presented in CLOUD'12.
10 March
Two presentations about Apache Mesos: one presentation follows the paper published in NSDI'11, the other presentation describes software. There is some potential duplication of effort in these two, so the two presenters should coordinate what they will present to allow more depth in what is presented.
5 March
Two presentations about Apache YARN: one presentation follows the paper published in SOCC'13, the other presentation describes software. There is some potential duplication of effort in these two, so the two presenters should coordinate what they will present to allow more depth in what is presented.

Presentations (last edited 2015-08-10 21:37:24 by Ted Herman)